The Wonder Number Lessons

  1. Basic Counting
  2. Comparison
  3. Addition – Single Digit
  4. Addition – Double Digit
  5. Subtraction – Single Digit
  6. Subtraction – Double Digit
  7. Patterning
  8. Multiples and Factors
  9. Multiplication
  10. Primes and Composites
  11. Squares
  12. Division – No Remainder
  13. Division – With Remainder
  14. Simplifying Fractions
  15. Least Common Denominator
  16. Goldbach’s Conjecture

Lesson No. 11:  Squares

The Wonder Number Learning System makes the concept of square numbers easy to understand.  It reinforces the concept with color-coded squares throughout the board.  The easiest way to explain to students what perfect squares are is to say they are made whenever you multiply a number by itself.

The first perfect square to look at is 25.  Take twenty-five green chips and make a 5x5 array with them anywhere on the board below the first three rows.  Next, place chips on all the multiples of 5 from 5 to 25 (see fig 59).  Each block will have a green 5 in the upper right hand corner of the block.  Then, take a viewer and place it on 25. 

Inside the block, there will be a green square around the number 25, again confirming that 25 is a perfect square (see fig 60).

The second perfect square to look at is 16.  Take sixteen yellow chips and make a 4x4 array with them anywhere on the board below the first three rows.  The sixteen chips can be made into several different rectangular arrays but, only one square (4x4), which means that 16 is a perfect square.  Next, place chips on all the multiples of 4 from 4 to 16 (see fig 61).  They will all have a yellow 4 in the upper right hand side of the block.   Then, take a viewer and place it on 16.  Inside the block, there will be a yellow square around the number 16, again confirming that 16 is a perfect square (see fig 62).

© 2007 The Wonder Number Learning System, Patent No. 3975051 Dated 1976